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Friday, July 31, 2009

The Seven Critical Elements of Strategy Execution

"The greatest strategy in the world is useless - if you cannot execute it."

Here are the seven critical elements of strategy execution:

  1. People. Strategy formulation often gathers the "smartest people in the room." However, it's not the senior leadership team that executes strategy - it's everyone in your workforce. Get the right people in the right positions.
  2. Communication. Strategy can only be executed if your employees know about it and really understands it. Most importantly, each person needs to understand how their daily activities fit with and support the strategy.
  3. Direction. When your new business strategy is communicated, do your employees know what to do differently? Do they have the right tools and individual plans to execute the strategy?
  4. Measurement. "You can't manage it, if you can't measure it." Do you have the right measures for monitoring the new strategy?
  5. Alignment. Your organization needs to be aligned between what you say you are going to do (strategy) and what vital few objectives, initiatives and daily activities (execution) you are undertaking to effectively support the strategy.
  6. Reward and Recognition. The introduction of a new strategy often introduces change in behavior. To ensure success, new behaviors need to be reinforced (rewarded for positive behaviors) so they are repeated.
  7. Continual Review. The execution of strategy must be continually reviewed in order to make mid-course corrections and to understand measurement success. Finding errors early in the process and making corrections improves your ability to execute strategy successfully.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

What Are CEOs and Managers Talking About Now?

A Harvard Business article recently showcased a the results of a CEO-peer group survey, indicating that the nature of CEO top concerns is changing as we move toward economic recovery.

While many of the CEOs had previously focused on topics of layoffs, profitability, and cash management, new concerns are beginning to emerge:

  • Strategy to invest in web 2.0/social marketing to capture consumer market share
  • Sales channel strategy to ramp sales of new products while driving down long-term costs
  • New service positioning pitch to capture an emerging market in the telecom space
  • Opportunity analysis--which projects to accelerate, which to cut?
  • New "Software as a Service" product roadmap
  • Investments in Marketing--where to experiment, how to allocate funds?
  • Taking advantage of a "fire sale" acquisition and plan to leverage it
  • Financing strategy--which term sheet, if any, to take?

BOTTOMLINE: HBR's summary: "Even the words contained in that list--strategy, ramp, opportunity, roadmap, experiment--are promising. The challenge isn't in believing that a bad economy is a time of opportunity, but rather in executing on the opportunities while staying prudent with day-to-day operations."

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Using Performance Management to Create a Culture of Excellence

CEO Holly G. Green (and author of "More Than A Minute") offers up a post "Using Performance Management to Create a Culture of Excellence."

Holly's prescription for a good performance management process involves five key steps:

  1. Establish Goals. Start by linking what needs to get done to the strategic planning framework. Align the competencies, skills and knowledge of the employee to create specific action items that will guide the employee’s behavior going forward.
  2. Plan Development. Discuss short- and long-term development needs, including agreement on how and when development will occur, as well as prioritization of development to support more immediate business needs. Create a plan to accomplish the required and the desired learning and growth.
  3. Take Action. Provide ongoing and frequent direction and support while the employee applies energy and focus toward accomplishing the goals.
  4. Assess Performance. Evaluate the progress being made toward the goals and provide ongoing feedback to the employee on a formal and informal basis.
  5. Provide Reward. Acknowledge and reward employees through organizational programs, local recognition, and other approaches tailored to individual employees. This may also involve consequences and disciplinary action for poor performance.

BOTTOMLINE: "Who has time to do all this on a regular basis?

Consider the consequences of not doing it: Lack of trust between employees and management; declining productivity and lost business due to missed deadlines and broken commitments; lower employee morale and higher turnover. These are just some of the more obvious consequences of a poorly implemented performance management system."

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Management Consulting Firms Becoming Licensed Affiliates for Six Disciplines

Professional service firms that offer management consulting services (strategic planning, operations management, human resources consulting, business advisory services) are quickly discovering the competitive advantages of offering a complete strategy execution coaching program to their clients.

In fact, four management consulting firms -- in just the past four months

...have become licensed licensed affiliates for the Six Disciplines strategy execution program to complement their management consulting service offerings.

Find out why management consulting firms are getting involved with Six Disciplines, by registering to attend the next webcast "Establishing a Strategy Execution Practice" on Tuesday August 11, from 12:00-1:00 PM EST.

This live webcast will be conducted by veteran CEO, strategy execution expert, and best-selling business author, Gary Harpst.

Register for the webcast here.

Monday, July 27, 2009

The Total Management Group, LLC Joins the Six Disciplines Strategy Execution Coaching Network

Washington D.C.-Based Consulting Firm Sees Growth through Strategy Execution Coaching Program

FINDLAY, OHIO – July 27, 2009 — Six Disciplines announced today that it has added the Washington D.C.-based consulting firm, The Total Management Group, LLC, to its nationwide network of business coaching practices that offer the Six Disciplines® strategy execution program to its clients. Six Disciplines is unique in the growing industry of business coaching because of its completeness, which includes the synergy of a repeatable business-building methodology, accountability coaching, an execution software system, and a shared community to accelerate organizational learning.

“Having served as the CEO of a strong engineering and software development company for 18 years, I can readily see the value that Six Disciplines brings to our clients,” said James Garrett, CEO of The Total Management Group. “The Six Disciplines methodology will help them achieve their goals, not just through planning, but through focused execution.”

“Six Disciplines is the perfect compliment to our consulting practice,” added Dr. David Christovich, The Total Management Group’s Vice President. “By using the Six Disciplines methodology and tools, our clients will be able to connect their vision to their strategies, and align their plans and activities for more consistent and predictable execution.”

“Forward-looking CEOs are starting to understand their biggest challenge is not what they think it is,” said Gary Harpst, founder and CEO of Six Disciplines. “They’re finally figuring out that it’s all about the balance of strategy and execution. The Total Management Group understands the tremendous opportunity ahead of them with Six Disciplines, and because of their expertise and proven success, we’re excited to welcome The Total Management Group to our business coaching network.”

About The Total Management Group

The Total Management Group provides strategic planning and execution services to business and government. Total Management CEO Jim Garrett co-founded SENTEL Corporation, an award-winning engineering and technology firm, which he led for eighteen years as its president and CEO. Under his leadership, the company -- which specialized in software and hardware engineering solutions for the military and U.S. government -- grew to 375 employees and $45 million in annual revenues. Visit The Total Management Group at http://www.thetotalmanagementgroup.com/ , email jGarrett@SixDisciplines.com, 571-346-7690 (office) or 301-661-2922 (cell).

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Webcast: Why Management Consultants Are Establishing a Strategy Execution Practice

Professional service firms that offer management consulting services (strategic planning, operations management, human resources consulting, business advisory services) are quickly discovering the competitive advantages of offering a complete strategy execution coaching program to their clients.

In fact, four management consulting firms -- in just the past four months --have signed on to offer the Six Disciplines strategy execution program to compliment their professional service offerings.

Find out why management consulting firms are getting involved with Six Disciplines, by registering to attend the next webcast "Establishing a Strategy Execution Practice" on Tuesday July 28, from 12:00-1:00 PM EST.

The webcast is conducted by veteran CEO, strategy execution expert, and best-selling business author, Gary Harpst.

Invest an hour of your time and investigate the competitive advantages of the Six Disciplines strategy execution coaching program.

Register for the webcast here.

Management Consultants Are Evolving Into Strategy Execution Coaches

Professional service firms that offer management consulting services (strategic planning, operations management, human resources consulting, business advisory services) are quickly discovering the competitive advantages of offering a complete strategy execution coaching program to their clients.

In fact, four management consulting firms -- in just the past four months --have signed on to offer the Six Disciplines strategy execution program to compliment their professional service offerings.

Find out why management consulting firms are getting involved with Six Disciplines, by registering to attend the next webcast "Establishing a Strategy Execution Practice" on Tuesday July 28, from 12:00-1:00 PM EST.

The webcast is conducted by veteran CEO, strategy execution expert, and best-selling business author, Gary Harpst.

Invest an hour of your time and investigate the competitive advantages of the Six Disciplines strategy execution coaching program.

Register for the webcast here.

Knowledge Transfer - A Generational Challenge

As large numbers of baby boomers retire, knowledge transfer becomes critical to an organization's sustainability and competitive edge. In a knowledge economy, firm-specific knowledge is critical to the sustainability, performance and innovation of organizations facing the imminent retirement of large numbers of baby boomers.

According to a new report from The Conference Board, the global research and business membership organization, most companies do not have a plan to manage and transfer knowledge and even fewer factor cross-generational challenges into business strategy.

The key challenge?

  • As the Baby Boom generation of corporate leaders and experts approaches retirement, businesses face the loss of experience and knowledge on an unprecedented scale.
  • Younger workers can't be counted on to fill the void, as they lack the experience that builds deep expertise.

The result?

  • A significant drain of business wisdom that decreases innovation, lowers growth capacity, and reduces efficiency in the organization

The solution?

  • Knowledge transfer methods include formal education and training, interviews, mentoring, apprenticeships, simulations and games, instant messaging, peer assists, communities of practice, job transfer, knowledge elicitation interviews, storytelling, Wikis, Blogs, research papers, and conferences.

BOTTOMLINE: To enable knowledge transfer, your strategy execution system must have a built-in method for recording and storing processes and procedures, document management, innovation exercises, historical activity archiving, and measure management. Without a repeatable process, knowledge transfer is unpredictable at best, and non-existent at worst.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

James Crisafulli Joins the Six Disciplines Business Coaching Network

Rhode Island-Based Consulting Firm Sees Growth through Strategy Execution Coaching Program

FINDLAY, OHIO – July 23, 2009 — Six Disciplines announced today that it has added Rhode Island-based consultant, James J. Crisafulli, to its nationwide network of business coaching practices that offer the Six Disciplines® strategy execution program to its clients. Six Disciplines is unique in the burgeoning industry of business coaching because of its completeness, which involves the synergy of a repeatable business-building methodology, accountability coaching, an execution software system, and a shared community to accelerate organizational learning.

“Six Disciplines is the only program that offers a complete strategy execution framework extending from the corner office to front line personnel. It includes the technology to easily monitor and measure the progress from a management and coaching perspective. Our efforts are focused on achieving a sustainable growth path by reviewing the execution progress and its impact on business performance. At the end of the day, it is about results; the Six Disciplines framework of strategy formulation, goal setting, initiative planning, leadership training, and 360 review process keeps strategy, policies and professionals aligned and focused on the target,” said Crisafulli.

“Forward-looking CEOs are starting to understand their biggest challenge is not what they think it is,” said Gary Harpst, founder and CEO of Six Disciplines. “They’re finally figuring out that it’s all about the balance of strategy and execution. James understands the tremendous opportunity ahead of him and his team with Six Disciplines, and because of their expertise and proven success, we’re excited to welcome James to our business coaching network.”

“Six Disciplines is the perfect complement to our consulting practice,” added Crisafulli. “By using the Six Disciplines methodology and tools, our clients will be able to connect their vision to their strategies, and align their plans and activities for more consistent and predictable execution.”


About James J. Crisafulli
James J. Crisafulli has been providing strategic planning and business coaching services to New England businesses since 1996. As a consultant to more than 200 businesses, he has developed a reputation for helping owners to improve their organizations and, in turn, their lives. James has a proven track record for identifying challenges that may be holding businesses back, helping the owners to resolve those issues, developing action plans that will help them meet their stated goals, and holding them accountable during the implementation phase. Contact James via email at JCrisafulli@SixDisciplines.com or (401) 762-2430.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

What Are The Six Disciplines - Video

Watch this short video as Six Disciplines CEO and founder Gary Harpst explains "What Are The Six Disciplines?"

During the interview, Harpst talks about each of the six disciplines described in detail in his award-winning book "Six Disciplines for Excellence."

video

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

The Ten Myths of Strategic Planning

CEOs of small businesses often appear to believe in myths surrounding the subject of strategic planning and execution - myths that can prove dangerous to the health of their organization.


  1. Myth #1: “We don’t need a strategic plan!” The truth is that every organization needs some form of plan to guide its actions or it will simply “drift off course” in the chaos businesses often face in their daily operations.
  2. Myth #2: Strategic planning can only be done at a resort. Strategic planning is serious and shouldn’t be equated with a vacation. Getting away from the distractions of the company environment is important, but all that is needed for a productive planning process is a meeting room at a local hotel, conference center
  3. Myth #3: “It interferes with our real jobs.” Strategic planning is arguably the most important part of any management team’s real job because it can determine the effectiveness of all the rest of its efforts. Working hard to advance along the wrong path does not constitute progress.
  4. Myth #4: “We can do it without any help.” It is extremely difficult to both participate in and facilitate the same meeting. For most executives, there is an almost irresistible urge to problem solve on detailed issues and therefore lose track of the big picture. An outside facilitator can manage the flow of the meeting to avoid uneven participation, shifting to problem solving, bogging down on one subject, accepting conventional wisdom as fact, etc.
  5. Myth #5: Planning will predict the future. Planning can reduce risk, but not eliminate it. It is easy to forget that any plan is a set of actions based on an assumption of how the future will unfold. Using the planning process to explore alternative futures, and the actions needed under those conditions, improves a firm’s ability to respond to whatever happens.
  6. Myth #6: Planning is done when the retreat is over. Planning is a process, not an event. If it is not a continued, integral component of the management of the firm, it is indeed a waste of time. It is best to check progress against the plan, and take corrective action for any deficiencies or changes --at least quarterly.
  7. Myth #7: The plan is a binder on a shelf. Documentation is necessary but the real benefit of a good plan is the mental framework for problem solving that it provides to employees. A strategic plan is really a way of thinking about the business, and it should change to some degree the way everyone goes about their job.
  8. Myth #8: The plan will automatically produce results. Without frequent, systematic oversight and review by the CEO and the management team, there will be little execution -- and the plan reduced to merely a set of words.
  9. Myth #9: If the CEO says it, it will happen. Actual execution of any plan only takes place when employees change their behavior to comply with the requirements of that plan. To implement the plan, employees must understand it and be willing to make the necessary changes to how they go about their individual responsibilities.
  10. Myth #10: “The plan is too confidential to be shared with regular employees.” See Myth #9. Even the best strategic plan will not produce the desired results if the people who have to execute it don’t know what it is. Your company will gain more competitive advantage from actually executing its plan, even if information about the plan falls into the hands of competitors, than it will from keeping the plan a perfect secret, and, as a result, not doing anything.

Monday, July 13, 2009

Webcast: The Evolution of Management Consulting

As a leader of your management consulting practice, you’re faced with the following challenges:

  1. How can I build a new, complimentary business practice – while increasing the value of my existing consulting services?
  2. Is there an effective way I can generate an additional $20-$40+k per client per year?
  3. How can I offer a new service to my existing clients – without a huge investment?
  4. What can I do to offer a new service - that will attract new clients too?
  5. How can I substantially increase the market value of my consulting practice?

Invest an hour of your time, and you’ll get answers to these questions by discovering a complimentary strategy execution coaching practice called Six Disciplines.

Join us on July 16 for an exclusive free webcast presentation “Establishing a Strategy Execution Practice” by veteran CEO and best-selling author, Gary Harpst.

WHEN: Thursday, July 16, 2009, from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Eastern

TO REGISTER: http://50cityjuly16webcast.eventbrite.com/

Knowledge Transfer Is Key To Sustaining Business Excellence

As baby boomers retire, companies are failing - in a big way - to transfer knowledge to the next generation of workers.

According to a recent study conducted by the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp), only 29% of responding organizations report that they incorporate retirement forecasts into their knowledge transfer practices, and only a third add "skills gap analysis" into those forecasts.

The crux of the problem?

"For all the public gnashing of teeth about the impending retirement of all those knowledgeable, hard-working Baby Boomers, relatively few organizations are doing much about it," says Jay Jamrog, SVP of research at i4cp. "They're going to wind up in a mad bar-the-doors scramble in the near future if they don't start trying to tap the knowledge of their most knowledgeable Boomers."

The solution?

Training remains the most conventional way to transfer knowledge in organizations, with 82% reporting that training is an ongoing knowledge transfer practice. This is especially true in larger companies (those with 5,000 or more employees), where more than 90% employ ongoing training. Another top practice cited was coaching, utilized by 55% of all reporting companies, and mentoring programs are used on an ongoing basis by 44% of organizations.

BOTTOMLINE: For small and midsized businesses to remain competitive, a formalized process of knowledge transfer (of trends, policies, procedures, information gathering, competitive intelligence, and so on...) must be deployed. This process must be open, transparent, collaborative and immediately available (think Twitter, Skype, SharePoint, Slideshare, Posterous, etc.) to share, capture, retain, and disseminate the knowledge.

Thursday, July 09, 2009

Top 10 Reasons To Hire a Business Coach

There are all types of coaches: a tennis coach, golf coach, swim coach, music coach, executive coach, and so on.

What do all these coaches have in common?

More importantly, why should you consider working with a business coach?

A coach won't do the work for you, but here's how a coach can help launch you (and your business) to the next level:

  1. A coach can be a confidant. You can tell your coach things you wouldn't tell others, because a coach is trained to understand and be non-judgmental.
  2. A coach can help you see your blind spots. Everyone, even the coach, has personal areas that are out of view or awareness until someone points them out. A coach is perfectly poised to perform this critical function.
  3. A coach can provide objective feedback. Other people may have agendas. Your coach has your best interests in mind in providing feedback and counsel to you.
  4. A coach provides another set of eyes. Even the top performers in the world have coaches to help them see what they themselves can't see.
  5. A coach can keep you accountable. Your coach can help you take on more responsibility by having you report weekly on your accomplishments and initiatives.
  6. A coach can be a sounding board. Your coach can be another set of ears as you talk about the things that are bothering you. As you hear yourself have a conversation new personal realizations emerge.
  7. A coach can be another source of creative ideas. You can brainstorm and try out new ideas, behaviors and mental processes as your coach provides a safe place to experiment.
  8. A coach can help you create your vision. Your coach can assist you in developing your plans for success based on your values, personal strengths, background and assets.
  9. A coach can help celebrate your successes and be a source of strength when you fail. Your coach can be a supportive and nurturing source of energy.
  10. A coach can help you process life. Life is a process and a good coach can assist you in reviewing and reframing what happens in your business, your sports and your life!
BOTTOMLINE: A business coach is not a therapist, not a consultant or even a mentor. Yet, a certified business coach, one that is trained in a repeatable business-building methodology, can make all the difference.

(Copyright © Bill Cole MentalGameCoach.com)

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

The Difference Between Coaching and Consulting

If you've seen professional coaches portrayed on TV or spotlighted in magazines, you may not always come away with an accurate perception of coaching.

Like any young profession that has experienced rapid growth, misconceptions have surfaced about the nature and purpose of professional coaching. As part of its work to advance the art, science, and practice of professional coaching, the International Coach Federation (ICF) works to educate the public on what to expect from a coaching partnership.

In a recent press release by the ICF, they made the attempt "to correct these inaccuracies by educating the public about our distinct profession and stressing the importance of working with a coach who has undergone formal coach-specifictraining and is credentialed."

One of the common misconceptions about coaching is that "Coaching and consulting are the same."

According to the ICF, coaches are experts in the coaching process and are trained to listen, observe and customize their approach to individual client needs. Whereas, consultants typically give clients answers or solutions based on expertise or knowledge in a certain area, coaches seek to elicit solutions and strategies from the client; they believe the client is naturally creative and resourceful."

At Six Disciplines, we offer a complete strategy execution coaching program through a network of Six Disciplines coaching practices, which are staffed by professional coaches who are certified on the Six Disciplines methodology. These accountability coaches are not "consultants" in the traditional sense. They offer companies training and assistance on how to adopt the Six Disciplines methodology throughout the organization -- not just at the senior leadership team level, but through an approach of "total organizational engagement".

What makes Six Disciplines coaches different from consultants is they "show" as opposed to "tell", and, unlike consultants, they don't leave. They are available to the client organizations throughout the adoption and implementation of the Six Disciplines program - which is an ongoing process.

Visit more information - visit Six Disciplines.

Monday, July 06, 2009

Effective Planning Retreat Best Practices

For business leaders who go on an annual planning retreat or "off-site", here's an article from the Harvard Business Review about "Off-Sites that Work"

Some key considerations:

  • Of all the meetings top executives go to in a year, none is more important than the strategy off-site, where the most essential conversations for the future of the business occur. Yet it is the rare management team that can say its strategy off-site truly changed the way the business is run.
  • At best, participants do some vague direction setting and work on team-building skills; at worst, they write off the retreat as a waste of time and resources. It needn’t be like that.

Here's a a set of best practices that businesses can use to make the most of this planning retreat process:

  • Essentially, the problem with most strategy off-sites is that they’re insufficiently structured. People think that if you schedule a meeting, invite top leaders (and perhaps an outside expert), and block off units of time to discuss big subjects, the rest will take care of itself. In reality, formlessness leads to aimlessness.

  • Oddly enough, only rigorously designed meetings give rise to truly candid strategy discussions. That rigor starts before the meeting, when the scope of the matters discussed must be limited, the participant list drawn up accordingly, the relevant materials (and only those) sent out and absorbed, and a detailed agenda established.

  • During the meeting, the pace and quality of the conversation can be managed through attention to politics and by using carefully tailored frameworks, decision points, and group exercises.

  • After the meeting, an action plan ensures clear accountability and follow-through."

BOTTOMLINE: "If you and your executive team spend four days a year rafting down rivers together, you’ll eventually get good at rafting down rivers.

Spend four days a year having well-designed strategy conversations together, and you will transform your annual off-site from a meaningless junket into a genuine turning point for your business."

Thursday, July 02, 2009

Strategic Planning Retreat? Don't Skip This Year's!

This Year's Management Off Site: Necessary or Negligent?

That's the title of a new article from Harvard Business Publishing, which offers up the pros and cons of scheduling the "annual planning retreat" during times of economic uncertainty.

The pros?

• Hunkering down is not a strategy.
• Management alignment is critical and at risk.
• Creativity is more important than ever.
• Pure ROI

The cons?

• Managers are talking more than ever now.
• It wouldn't be prudent to spend money on a hotel, food and facilitator.
• It sends a bad message to those still on-site.

BOTTOMLINE: The authors suggest the following:

"I would not advocate postponing or skipping your strategic planning session. Strategy is as important if not more important than ever. They are meaningful events. Successful off sites build employee loyalty and camaraderie. When I think back on my positive business experiences, they cluster around positive team interactions happening during off site sessions. Also, much greater work happens when employees are unencumbered by both in-the-business and personal obligations."

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Execution of Strategy Requires Change

The successful execution of strategy ultimately requires a change in the behavior of employees.

New research conducted over the last two decades has produced a more accurate view of human behavior change resulting from an integration of psychology (the study of the human mind and human behavior) and neuroscience (the study of the anatomy and physiology of the brain).

An article titled “The Neuroscience of Leadership“, from Strategy+Business provides an interesting discussion on organisational change, some of the interesting points raised in the article are:

Some key points from the research:

  • Change Is Pain: Organizational change is unexpectedly difficult because it provokes sensations of physiological discomfort. Trying to change any hardwired habit requires a lot of effort, in the form of attention. This often leads to a feeling that many people find uncomfortable. So they do what they can to avoid change.
  • Behaviorism doesn’t work: Change efforts based on incentive and threat (the carrot and the stick) rarely succeed in the long run. Present the right incentives, and the desired change will naturally occur…… Yet there is plenty of evidence from both clinical research and workplace observation that change efforts based on typical incentives and threats (the carrot and the stick) rarely succeed in the long run.
  • Humanism is overrated: In practice, the conventional empathic approach of connection and persuasion doesn’t sufficiently engage people. This phenomenon provides a scientific basis for some of the practices of leadership coaching. Rather than lecturing and providing solutions, effective coaches ask pertinent questions and support their clients in working out solutions on their own…. People can detect the difference between authentic inquiry and an effort to persuade them.
  • Focus is power: The act of paying attention creates chemical and physical changes in the brain.
  • Expectation shapes reality: People’s preconceptions have a significant impact on what they perceive. How, then, would you go about facilitating change? The impact of mental maps suggests that one way to start is by cultivating moments of insight. Large-scale behavior change requires a large-scale change in mental maps.
  • Attention density shapes identity: Repeated, purposeful, and focused attention can lead to long-lasting personal evolution. For insights to be useful, they need to be generated from within, not given to individuals as conclusions.
  • Mindful Change in Practice. Start by leaving problem behaviors in the past; focus on identifying and creating new behaviors. Over time, these may shape the dominant pathways in the brain. This is achieved through a solution-focused questioning approach that facilitates self-insight, rather than through advice-giving.

BOTTOMLINE: "Perhaps you are thinking, “This all sounds too easy. Is the answer to all the challenges of change just to focus people on solutions instead of problems, let them come to their own answers, and keep them focused on their insights?” Apparently, that’s what the brain wants."

(Tip of the hat to George Amber at The Practice of Leadership)